Oct 19th

WHATSAPP VOICECHAT GROUP @+919592221768

By Gurlal .

WE LOVE ENGLISH

in E-√oicechat group we can share english :

√oice messages.

Audios.

Videos.

Images.

News articles.

Jokes.

Inspirational thoughts.

Our professional knowledge.

Stories,poems,novels,plays,essays(may be our own)

Grammar tips and word meanings.

Our doubts about any english topic.

Replies to our friends doubts.

Riddles,cross word puzzles,scramble etc,

GD topics like for ex -should alcohol be banned in the world? Why yes,Why no.

Web links to english learning communties.

Everything about english.

Please 

Be nice ,kind, and welcoming to one another.

If you cant speak nice,

Dont speak at all.

The use of vulgar language will not be tolerated.leave any religious /political/border issue/personal quarrer at home.

Are you interested.

You are welcome.

Please join using this link-

https://chat.whatsapp.com/ACzmiczt5lcD600VGaiRwu

 

 

 

Oct 4th

10 helpfull tips for research proposal

By Jerome Mancilla

Ten tips for writing your research proposal 

1.  Follow the instructions!

Read and conform to all instructions found on the council website. Make sure that your proposal fits the criteria of the competition.

2.  Break down your proposal into point form before writing your first draft.

Based on the total length of the proposal, decide whether you will have headings/subheadings and what they will be (e.g., Introduction, Background Material, Methodology, and so on).

These headings can be selected based on the advice given in the specific award instructions. For each section, lay out in point form what you will discuss.

3.  Know your audience.

Describe your research proposal in non-technical terms. Use clear, plain language and avoid jargon.

Make sure your proposal is free of typographic and grammatical errors.  

Remember that, at every level, adjudication committees are multi-disciplinary and will include researchers in fields other than your own.

Therefore, follow the KIS principle – Keep It Simple! Reviewers like it that way. 

4.  Make an impact in the first few sentences.

Reviewers are very busy people. You must grab their attention and excite them about your project from the very beginning. Make it easy for them to understand (and thus fund) your proposal.

Show how your research is innovative and valuable. Remember, too, to show your enthusiasm for your project—enthusiasm is contagious!

Organize your proposal so that it is tight, well-integrated, and makes a point, focused on a central question (e.g., “I am looking at this to show...”).

Depending on the discipline, a tight proposal is often best achieved by having a clear hypothesis or research objective and by structuring the research proposal in terms of an important problem to be solved or fascinating question to be answered. Make sure to include the ways in which you intend to approach the solution.

5.  Have a clear title.

It is important that the title of your project is understandable to the general public, reflects the goal of the study, and attracts interest.

6.  Emphasize multidisciplinary aspects of the proposal, if applicable.

 7.  Show that your research is feasible.

Demonstrate that you are competent to conduct the research and have chosen the best research or scholarly environment in which to achieve your goals.

8.  Clearly indicate how your research or scholarship will make a “contribution to knowledge” or address an important question in your field.

9.  Get the proposal reviewed and commented on by others.

Get feedback and edit. Then edit some more. And get more feedback. The more diverse opinion and criticism you receive on your proposal the better suited it will be for a multi-disciplinary audience.

10.  Remember that nothing is set in stone.

Your research proposal is not a binding document; it is a proposal. It is well understood by all concerned that the research you end up pursuing may be different from that in your proposal. 

Instead of treating your proposal as a final, binding document, think of it as a flexible way to plan an exciting (but feasible) project that you would like to pursue.

Oct 3rd

Importance of English Language.

By Earl Rosen

Reasons why learning English is so important.

  1. I agreed that English may not be the most spoken language in the world, but it is the official language in a large number of countries.It is estimated that almost 2 billion people in the world communicate in English language on daily basis
  2. English is the dominant business language and it has become almost a necessity for people to speak English if they are to enter a global workforce, research from all over the world shows that cross-border business communication is most often conducted in English. Its importance in the global market place therefore cannot be understated, learning English really can change your life.
  3. Many of the world’s top films, books and music are published and produced in English. Therefore by learning English you will have access to a great wealth of entertainment and will be able to have a greater cultural understanding.
  4. Most of the content produced on the internet (50%) is in English. So knowing English will allow you access to an incredible amount of information which may not be otherwise available! Although learning English can be challenging and time consuming, we can see that it is also very valuable to learn and can create many opportunities.
  5. Technology helps to enhance our skills and wise guys utilize their precious time to gain education by using online education systems. Its become the most favorite technology around the world. 
Oct 3rd

Tips to Improve English

By Harry White
Follwing Tips will be helpful to improve your English!
  1. Don't be afraid to make mistakes. ...
  2. Surround yourself in English. ...
  3. Practise every day. ...
  4. Tell your family and friends about your study plan. ...
  5. Practise the 4 core skills: reading, writing, speaking and listening.
Oct 3rd

How to learn easy English?

By Xavier Fowler
 
Keep a notebook of new words you learn. Use them in sentences and try to say them at least 3 times when you speak. Use dictionary once a day for new words. Memorisation of lists is one of the most common ways of learning vocabulary for a test.
Oct 3rd

Definition of Articles

By Xavier Fowler

Definition of Articles

An article is a word used to modify a noun, which is a person, place, object, or idea. Technically, an article is an adjective, which is any word that modifies a noun. Usually adjectives modify nouns through description, but articles are used instead to point out or refer to nouns. There are two different types of articles that we use in writing and conversation to point out or refer to a noun or group of nouns: definite and indefinite articles.

Definite Article

Let's begin by looking at the definite article. This article is the word the, and it refers directly to a specific noun or groups of nouns. For example:

  • the freckles on my face
  • the alligator in the pond
  • the breakfast burrito on my plate

Each noun or group of nouns being referred to - in these cases freckles, alligator, and breakfast burrito - is direct and specific.

Indefinite Articles

Indefinite articles are the words a and an. Each of these articles is used to refer to a noun, but the noun being referred to is not a specific person, place, object, or idea. It can be any noun from a group of nouns. For example:

  • a Mercedes from the car lot
  • an event in history

In each case, the noun is not specific. The Mercedes could be any Mercedes car available for purchase, and the event could be any event in the history of the world.

Article Usage with Examples

Properly using a definite article is fairly straightforward, but it can be tricky when you are trying to figure out which indefinite article to use. The article choice depends on the sound at the beginning of the noun that is being modified. There is a quick and easy way to remember this.

If the noun that comes after the article begins with a vowel sound, the appropriate indefinite article to use is 'an.' A vowel sound is a sound that is created by any vowel in the English language: 'a,' 'e,' 'i,' 'o,' 'u,' and sometimes 'y' if it makes an 'e' or 'i' sound. For example:

  • an advertisement on the radio (this noun begins with 'a,' which is a vowel)