Both / both of......neither / neither of......either / either of !!

Wed, Jan 4 2012 03:52pm GMT 1
Ahoo ....
Ahoo ....
53 Posts

We use both/neither/either for two things. You can use these words with anoun (both books, neither book etc.).

For example, you are talking about going out to eat this evening. There are two restaurants where you can go. You say:

· Both restaurants are very good. (not ‘ the both restaurants’).

· Neither restaurant is expensive.

· We can go to either restaurant. I don’t mind. ( either=one or the other, it doesn’t matter which one)

Both of... / neither of…/ either of…

When we use both/neither/either + of, you always need the …/ these/those…/ my/ yours/ his/ Tom’s…. (etc.). You cannot say ‘both of restaurants’. You have to say ‘both of the restaurants’, ‘both of thoserestaurants’ etc. :

· Both of these restaurants are very good.

· Neither of the restaurants we went to was (or were) expensive.

· I haven’t been to be either of those restaurants. (= I haven’t been to one or the other)

You don’t need of after both. So you can say:

· Both my parents are from London. or Both of my parents….

You can use both of / neither of / either of + us/you/them:

· (talking to two people) Can either of you speaking Spanish?

· I asked two people the way to the station but neither of them knew.

You must say ‘both of’ before us/you/them (of is necessary):

· Both of us were very tired. (not ‘ Both us were…’)

After neither of... a singular or a plural verb is possible:

· Neither of the children wants ( or want) to go to bed.

You can also use both/neither/either alone:

· I couldn’t decide which of the two shirts to buy. I liked both. ( or I likedboth of them. )

· ‘Is your friend British or American?’ ‘Neither. She’s Australian.’

· ‘Do you want tea or coffee?’ ‘Either. I don’t mind.’

You can say: Bothand…:

· Both Sara and Abdullah were late.

· I was both tired and hungry when I arrived home.

Neither ….nor…:

· Neither Ali nor Omer came to the party.

· She said she would contact me but she neither wrote nor phoned.

Eitheror…:

· I’m not sure where he’s from. He’s either Arabic or Italian.

· Either you apologies or I’ll never speak to you again.

Compare either/neither/both (two things) and any/none/all (more than two):

· There are two good hotels in the town. You can stay at either of them.

· There are many good hotels in the town. You can stay at any of them.

· We tried two hotels. Neither of them had any rooms. / Both of them were full.

· We tried a lot of hotels. None of them had any rooms. / All of them were full.


English Grammar in Use by Raymond Murphy

Thu, Jan 5 2012 02:27am GMT 2
cosmicman 9
cosmicman 9
43 Posts
Laughing good job , really informative stuff
Thu, Jan 5 2012 10:12am GMT 3
Ahoo ....
Ahoo ....
53 Posts
Got happy you liked :)
Sun, Jan 15 2012 06:34pm GMT 4
Mariam Rose
Mariam Rose
1 Posts

thank u %

Tue, Jan 17 2012 04:57am GMT 5
DUMBO .............
DUMBO .............
113 Posts
good job, thx ahoo ma'am
its really informative one
Fri, Jan 27 2012 05:25pm GMT 6
Ahmed  Kutty
Ahmed Kutty
3 Posts
Thanx a lot for posting such a useful material.....and expect more of this kind..
Mon, Feb 13 2012 08:34pm GMT 7
mahsa sadegh
mahsa sadegh
1 Posts
i appreciate you for this useful grammer.
Tue, Feb 14 2012 07:19pm GMT 8
DUMBO .............
DUMBO .............
113 Posts

Why did’t I find it earlier!! This lesson is very useful for me. Now everything is easier, he he :)

Thanks!!

Tue, Feb 14 2012 07:23pm GMT 9
DUMBO .............
DUMBO .............
113 Posts
Rather than - shows preference. This expression is generally used in 'parallel' structures. e.g - with two nouns, adjectives, adverbs, infinitives or -ing forms.

e.g

1). We ought to invest in machinery rather than buildings.
2). I prefer starting early rather than leaving things to the last minute.

When the main clause has a to - infinitive, rather than is usually followed by an infinitive without to or -ing form.

e.g - I decided to write rather than phone/phoning.

Instead of - suggests that one person, thing or action replaces another. Instead is not used alone as a preposition; we use the two words instead of.
Instead of is not usually followed by an infinitive.

e.g

1). I'll have tea instead of coffee, please.
2). I stayed in bed all day instead of going to work.
3). Amit was invited to the reception, but he was ill, so Akash went instead of him.

Note - Instead (without of) is an adverb. It begins or ends a clause usually.

e.g - She didn't go to Greece after all. Instead , she went to America.


NOTE :
Usage --- instead of + noun phrase. Instead of is only a preposition and can introduce only a phrase i.e no verb
Usage --- rather than + verb (or) rather than + noun. Further rather than can act as a preposition and can introduce a prepositional phrase or can act as a conjunction and introduce a clause.
Mon, Feb 20 2012 05:19pm GMT 10
nilan kumara kumara
nilan kumara kumara
1 Posts
thanks veryuseful
lesson
Sat, Feb 25 2012 05:30pm GMT 11
DUMBO .............
DUMBO .............
113 Posts
anytime bro
we all r here to help each other for learning purpose
:)
Sat, Feb 25 2012 05:31pm GMT 12
karthik kar
karthik kar
1 Posts
Thanks for the information
Sat, Feb 25 2012 05:32pm GMT 13
DUMBO .............
DUMBO .............
113 Posts

i.e. versus e.g.


A lot of people use i.e. and e.g. interchangeably. Do allow me to explain why this is wrong.

"i.e." is short for the Latin "id est," literally meaning "it is" or "that is." Use "i.e." when you would say "that is."

I saw Xena today -- i.e., I saw Argo with a dark-haired woman on her back, so I assumed it was Xena.

"e.g." is short for the Latin "exempli gratia," meaning "free example." Use "e.g." when you would say "for example."

I love all the subtext episodes, e.g. ADITL.
Sun, Feb 26 2012 03:38pm GMT 14
deepak pundir
deepak pundir
3 Posts
tnk U mam n how to pronunce them as they a genrally pronounced ?
Sun, Feb 26 2012 04:14pm GMT 15
DUMBO .............
DUMBO .............
113 Posts
don't worry bro, I'll try to upload a video concerning pronunciation,
enjoy ure learning,
best of luck
Mon, Mar 19 2012 12:39pm GMT 16
IMRAN ULLAH
IMRAN ULLAH
5 Posts
nice bro
Mon, Mar 19 2012 12:44pm GMT 17
DUMBO .............
DUMBO .............
113 Posts

May / might

may

We can use 'may' to ask for permission. However this is rather formal and not used very often in modern spoken English

  • May I borrow your pen?
  • May we think about it?
  • May I go now?

We use 'may' to suggest something is possible

  • It may rain later today.
  • I may not have time to do it today.
  • Pete may come with us

might

We use 'might' to suggest a small possibility of something. Often we read that 'might' suggests a smaller possibility that 'may', there is in fact little difference and 'might is more usual than 'may' in spoken English.

  • She might be at home by now but it's not sure at all.
  • It might rain this afternoon.
  • I might not have time to go to the shops for you.
  • I might not go.

For the past, we use 'might have'.

  • He might have tried to call while I was out.
  • I might have dropped it in the street.

Thu, Apr 25 2013 04:40am BST 18
Naomi Mandatary
Naomi Mandatary
2 Posts
good info bro
Wed, Jul 24 2013 08:16am BST 19
soniyaa khan
soniyaa khan
3 Posts
thanks for giving good information
Fri, Mar 21 2014 07:59am GMT 20
Noor Noor
Noor Noor
3 Posts
thanksSmile
Fri, Apr 25 2014 01:45pm BST 21
vikash  singh
vikash singh
10 Posts
the use of MAy/ Might was i understood but either neither i did not understand . so can uoy explian it by teaching in very easy way and with a lot of example.....



thanks and regard
Fri, Apr 25 2014 01:47pm BST 22
vikash  singh
vikash singh
10 Posts
it would be better for learner that start from the basic so that we may improve..............
Wed, Mar 2 2016 02:36am GMT 23
hichemsoft hichem
hichemsoft hichem
1 Posts
absolutely, those lessons are very interesting, thank you for all those explanations and keep doing
Wed, Sep 14 2016 04:35pm BST 24
Mohamed  AbdelRady
Mohamed AbdelRady
1 Posts

Goof

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